Trucks Only Lanes in Atlanta Debate Heats Up

The Georgia Department of Transporatation continues to study the feasibility of “trucks only” lanes here in Metropolitan Atlanta. I encourage you to speak in favor of the proposal as it would increase your safety as a member of the motoring public here in Atlanta and in Georgia. The Georgia Department of Transportation invites the public to view I-75/I-575 project maps, plans and displays and to voice their opinions on the expansion at the following meetings. For more information see www.nwhovbrt.com/ or call 404-377-4012.
Statistics in Atlanta show that even now traffic tops 10,000 trucks per day on the north end of I-285 and 30,000 trucks per day on parts of I-75. This represents a potential 40,000 truck and car wreck accidents looking for a place to happen on the roads of Metropolitan Atlanta. The tonnage shipped to, from and through Georgia is forecast to increase by 63 percent by 2025. Freight movement in the state is dominated by trucking, which carries 87 percent of all cargo. More than 100 motor freight carriers serve the Atlanta area alone. Georgia has 35 scheduled carriers, 2,200 intrastate haulers, and 25,000 interstate truckers serving points throughout the state. And we all know that in a wreck between an 18 wheeler and a small passenger car, the 18 wheeler wins. In my tractor-trailer cases I handle in my personal injury law practice, I can attest to the devastation that a wreck with a tractor-trailer can have on a family.
One Georgia possibility to expedite truck traffic is toll-financed truck freeways. When the Reason Public Policy Institute asked trucking companies to propose routes on which they would consider paying tolls in order to operate long double and triple tractor-trailers, the companies came up with 17 possible routes.[20] One of Reason’s tollway recommendations after analysis was the I-75 corridor from the Ohio Turnpike near Toledo south through Cincinnati, central Kentucky and Tennessee, and Atlanta to the northern end of Florida’s Turnpike and Tampa. Reason predicts it would be “a major north-south trucking route of high efficiency and safety.” I think Georgia should continue to explore this option through these public hearings about “trucks only” lanes.